REVIEWS

/ MICHELLE GRABNER
Arturo Herrera’s “Series”

CORBETT VS. DEMPSEY, Chicago

View of Arturo Herrera "Series," Corbett vs. Dempsey, Chicago, 2012.
by

Michelle Grabner

Collage is Arturo Herrera’s preferred medium. He deploys its vast paper-based vocabulary the same way an abstract painter would activate a range of color, mark, stroke, and line. But it is the juxtaposition of disparate imagery, structural invention, and the disjunction of fragments and surfaces that drive his collages. Critic... continue reading
Rodney Graham

DONALD YOUNG GALLERY, Chicago

Rodney Graham, Leaping Hermit, 2011.
by

Michelle Grabner

“Our culture hero is not the artist or reformer, not the saint or scientist, but the entrepreneur. (Think of Steve Jobs, our new deity.) Autonomy, adventure, imagination: entrepreneurship comprehends all this and more for us. The characteristic art form of our age may be the business plan.” This cultural postulate... continue reading
View of, "Dear David Johnson," at moniquemeloche, Chicago, 2011.
by

Michelle Grabner

Combining realist fiction with strains of truthiness, Rinus Van de Velde harnesses our contemporary compulsion for storytelling for its own sake, stating, “although the stories I create are fictional, I still try to believe in them.” But he also employs fiction as a literary device to undercut a host of... continue reading
Claire Sherman’s “Palms Wild”

KAVI GUPTA GALLERY, Chicago

Claire Sherman's "Palms Wild" at Kavi Gupta Gallery, Chicago
by

Michelle Grabner

Representational landscape is a risky genre. Its natural grandeur and boundless perspectives can seduce, instilling wonder and discovery. Yet more often, the genre triggers trite familiarity with both the subject and the material quality of the medium. Claire Sherman, however, with her nimble brushwork and compositional restraint, manages to navigate the perceptual underpinnings of landscape painting while confidently delivering its abstract realities. Back in the 19th... continue reading
Karl Haendel's "My Invisible Friend" at Tony Wight Gallery, Chicago
by

Michelle Grabner

"I must get out of this house," betrays the thought bubble floating near Tom's bewildered expression as he sits in an overstuffed chair with an open book in his hands. Tom, the feline-half of the notorious duo Tom & Jerry, sits alone without his little tormentor in Karl Haendel's Tom & Jerry #3 (2010), a hand-drawn graphite appropriation of a comic panel that muses on Tom's self-awareness. The book the cat holds in this frame is a generic "everybook," and its... continue reading

AUTHOR

view all

GALLERY

view all
Abc
Bq
Kow
M+B
Non
Vw

ARTIST

view all
ArtAsiaPacific
flashart
Magazine Mousse
P420
Peres Projects
Gallery Ernst Hilger
Sprueth Magers
Kaleidoscope
e-flux iPad
Michael Kon
galeria nara roesler
The Third Line
Aperture