REVIEWS

/ Basel
Basel Roundup

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, Basel

Bruce Nauman, Model for Trench and Four Buried Passages, 1977.
by

Chris Sharp

This Art Basel Roundup comes fresh on the heels of a visit to the opening of the 10th Berlin Biennale. This is significant because, whatever you might say about the current edition, it was conspicuously and refreshingly non-white and non-Western-European centric. As a white-dude viewer, I felt, perhaps for the... continue reading
Sofia Hultén, History in Imaginary Time, 2012.
by

Aoife Rosenmeyer

I just didn’t get Sofia Hultén’s work Pattern Recognition (2017). Several sets of 12 small perforated metal sheets, like those that hang on workshop walls, are arranged in tidy grids. Each set holds a number of tools or objects, short pieces of chain on one, plastic cutting templates on another,... continue reading
View of Charlie Godet Thomas’s “Roman-fleuve,” Vitrine, Basel.
by

Aoife Rosenmeyer

An exhibition vitrine in a contemporary exhibition is a knowing nod to long traditions of display. By recreating a form of museum presentation, it relates to what Tony Bennett calls the “museum idea”(1) and its way of defining knowledge and, more broadly, power. Museums, according to Bennett, are places where... continue reading
Art Basel

ART BASEL, Basel

Claudia Comte, Now I Won (detail), 2017.
by

Daniel Horn

The air was hot and filled with din. Art Basel 2017 opened on Tuesday as a more laid-back affair than the previous two editions, but the overall mood was nonetheless upbeat. And how could it not be, given the breathtakingly vulgar fun-fair installation Now I Won (2017) by Swiss artist... continue reading
Art Basel and Liste

ART BASEL, Basel

View of Art Basel’s Unlimited section, Art Basel 2016.
by

Jennifer Piejko

When word got out that Hervé Falciani, a dapper systems engineer at HSBC’s hushed private bank in Geneva, had lifted the identities and details of 130,000 account holders in 2008, the Swiss government was put in the unfortunate position of having to ask its neighbors to extradite this thief or... continue reading
View of John Wood and Paul Harrison, “Some things are undesigned,” von Bartha, Basel, 2015.
by

Ingo Niermann

There are countless jokes about modern art being ridiculously boring and about people only being into it to distinguish themselves from the unrefined, who expect from art what hungry people expect from food. When people keep making fun of you, you can pretend not to listen, or you can start making... continue reading

AUTHOR

view all

GALLERY

view all
Abc
Bq
Kow
M+B
Non
Vw

ARTIST

view all
flashart
Magazine Mousse
ArtAsiaPacific
sp-arte
Hilger
Kaleidoscope
galeria nara roesler
Blum&Poe
art-agenda
The Third Line
Xavier Hufkens
Michael Kon
Deweer