REVIEWS

/ Los Angeles
Judith Bernstein, Judith, 2017.
by

Sabrina Tarasoff

There is no image more prescient of modern displays of masculinity and status than Judith Bernstein’s drawing COCK IN THE BOX (1966), inspired by a history of Vietnam-era bathroom-stall graffiti. Whether those lewd sketches were made to parody politics in wartime, as comic relief for those on the john, for... continue reading
View of Terence Koh’s “sleeping in a beam of sunlight,” Moran Bondaroff, Los Angeles, 2017.
by

Jonathan Griffin

Over the decade and a half of his career to date, Terence Koh has generated so many myths that it is now nearly impossible to begin thinking about his work without first acknowledging the tales of his personal and professional decadence in New York during the pre-crash mid-aughts, or the... continue reading
Paul Thek

HANNAH HOFFMAN GALLERY, Los Angeles

View of "Paul Thek," Hannah Hoffman Gallery, Los Angeles, 2016-17.
by

Jennifer Piejko

There is no more poetic organ than the human heart: a blood-soaked snarl of muscle tissue whose constriction is our literal life force, its cadence—its pulse—has been held accountable for not only bodily function but as the instrument of conscience, intention, love, and courage; a spiritual and corporal engine. The... continue reading
Isa Genzken’s “I Love Michael Asher”

HAUSER WIRTH & SCHIMMEL, Los Angeles

View of Isa Genzken’s “I Love Michael Asher,” Hauser Wirth & Schimmel, Los Angeles, 2016.
by

Travis Diehl

In a shallow bay window facing 2nd St., a ledge overflows with studio clutter: a couple dozen euros in coins between a few dying plants; a bowl filled with loose earrings and studs; a keycard from the Waldorf Astoria; a castle of used tea candles, Red Bull cans, and tiny... continue reading
Marnie Weber, The Day of Forevermore, 2016.
by

Andrew Berardini

During the day, Halloween masks look pretty cheesy. Hanging from the drugstore rack’s seasonal aisle under the terrible clarity of fluorescents and the afternoon sun, it’s hard to image these killer clowns and fat-cheeked Frankensteins frightening anyone. Their warped faces and weeping pustules, yellowed horns and sharpened teeth, all a... continue reading
Hanne Darboven

SPRüTH MAGERS, Los Angeles

Hanne Darboven, Erdkunde I, II, III (Geography I, II, III), 1986.
by

Jonathan Griffin

Rows of numbers instill in me a sickening panic. I got that feeling, familiar from childhood mathematics lessons and annual tax returns, in Hanne Darboven’s current exhibition at Sprüth Magers, Los Angeles. Perhaps there was no need for such histrionics. In 1973, the West German Darboven told the writer Lucy Lippard... continue reading

AUTHOR

view all

GALLERY

view all
Abc
Bq
Kow
Non
Vw

ARTIST

view all
GALLERIA MASSIMODELUCA
galeria nara roesler
Luisa Strina
Magazine Mousse
Sprueth Magers
Tulips & Roses
Vitamin creative space
Friedrich Petzel
Carolina Nitsch
Xavier Hufkens
MIA Art Fair
Brooklyn Rail
Spike