Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona presents Metamorphosis

Ladislas Starevitch, L’horloge magique, 1928. © Collection
Martin-Starevitch.

Metamorphosis. Fantasy Visions
in Starewitch, Švankmajer and
the Quay Brothers

26 March–7 September 2014

Opening: Tuesday, 25 March, 7:30pm

Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona
c/ Montalegre, 5
08001 Barcelona
Spain

www.cccb.org

Creators present in the exhibition:
Ladislas Starewitch / Jan Švankmajer / Quay Brothers / Leonardo Alenza / Giuseppe Arcimboldo / Walerian Borowczyk / Charles Bowers / Luis Buñuel / Émile Cohl / Segundo de Chomón / Salvador Dalí / Monsu Desiderio / James Ensor Loie Fuller / Francisco de Goya / Jean Grandville / Emma Hauck / Atanasio Kircher Alfred Kubin / Charles Le Brun / Eugenio Lucas / Marey / Josep Masana / Méliès Joaquim Pla Janini / Lotte Reiniger / Bruno Schulz / Irène Starewitch / Eva Švankmajerová / Robert Walser

Curated by experimental film specialist Carolina López Caballero.

The exhibition Metamorphosis presents the oeuvre of four key figures in animation cinema: the Russian resident in Paris, Ladislas Starewitch (1882–1965), a pioneer in the genre, the Czech master Jan Švankmajer (1934) and the unclassifiable Quay Brothers (1947), recently the subject of an exhibition at the New York MoMA. Though little known to the general public, these filmmakers are hugely influential in various fields of contemporary creation as references for, among others, filmmakers Tim Burton and Terry Gilliam.

This is the first time that the work of these four artists has been presented in depth in Spain, but what makes it a real international event is the fact that it brings together the work of these four animators engaged in an explicit dialogue: the Quay Brothers are self-confessed admirers of Jan Švankmajer, and the three are accompanied by Starewitch.

The exhibition swings back and forth between the specific world of each of these artists and their shared universe, with the direct participation of Jan Švankmajer and the Quay Brothers, who are producing an installation specially for the show.

The leading thread is a presentation of their careers in cinema and the pieces they have used and constructed to make their films: sets, puppets, drawings and objects.

Alongside it, an array of literary, artistic and cinematographic references illustrate the influences recognised by the artists: fairytales, horror stories, the world of dreams, the cabinet of curiosities, pre-enlightenment science, alchemy, magic and illusionism come together in the exhibition galleries in the form of works by foremost creators like Francisco de Goya, James Ensor, Alfred Kubin, Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Méliès and Luis Buñuel. This is an imaginary that ranges from dark romanticism, symbolism and surrealism to the present day, especially in genres regarded as marginal, which in the hands of these animators become the most radical modernity.

The exhibition sets out to rediscover and awaken curiosity in a brotherhood of artists who with their radicalness, imagination and their very stance are open to reinterpretation in the framework of culture today and a contextualization of their potential for subversion. The Metamorphosis experience (the exhibition plus its parallel activities of a film cycle and talks) begs a reflection on the curiosity/knowledge duality and the new role of the marginal in contemporary creation. At a time of oversaturation of information, it is important to redefine the concept of marginality.

Metamorphosis. Fantasty Visions in Starewitch, Švankmajer and the Quay Brothers is a coproduction of the Centre de Cultura Contemporània de Barcelona and La Casa Encendida Fundación Caja Madrid (Madrid), where it will continue, after its run at the CCCB, from 2 October 2014 to 11 January 2015.

Publication
A bilingual catalogue (Catalan/English & Spanish/English) accompanies the exhibition.

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