REVIEWS

/ PATRICK LANGLEY
View of Ed Atkin’s “Olde Food” at Cabinet, London, 2018.
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Patrick Langley

A boy in a bruise-pink jacket jogs through a dusky idyll, limp-kneed and panting for breath. The grass that flanks the path is dappled with blooming flowers: purple, yellow, orange, and white. In the foreground is an upright piano, incongruously plonked between two trees. The boy staggers past it and... continue reading
Helsinki Roundup

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, Helsinki

Karel Koplimets, Case No 13. Waiting for the Ship of Empties, 2017.
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Patrick Langley

En route to Helsinki this February, as the plane dropped through patchy cloud on its descent to the Finnish capital, I peered through the window at the country’s south coast. Instead of a clean line demarcating land from sea, there was a fragmentary confusion of dark islands set amid wastes... continue reading
David Blandy, The End of the World, 2017.
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Patrick Langley

In his three-volume book Principles of Geology (1830-1833), Charles Lyell pioneered a theory whose clunky title belies its elegance. Uniformitarianism, as Lyell’s argument is known, suggests that the earth was shaped, over hundreds of millions of years, by incremental processes that are observable all around us: erosion, sedimentation, and so... continue reading
View of "When my eyes saw and when my ears heard," Hollybush Gardens, London, 2017.
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Patrick Langley

In her 1974 memoir Handbook in Motion, Simone Forti describes how, when she moved from San Francisco to New York in 1959, the city seemed a “maze of concrete mirrors.”(1) New York didn’t just disorient: it “shocked” her. She took solace from the city’s alienating architecture by rooting herself in... continue reading
View of Christina Mackie's "Drift Rust," Herald Street, London, 2017.
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Patrick Langley

Christina Mackie’s installations have an instinctive and provisional feel about them. They present the viewer with arrays of disparate objects, arranged on trestle tables, walls, and shelves, assembled according to a spontaneous logic of correspondence and juxtaposition. Mackie refers to this aspect of her work as “trestle art.”(1) Wolfgang Tillmans’... continue reading
Huma Bhabha

STEPHEN FRIEDMAN GALLERY, London

View of "Huma Bhabha," Stephen Friedman Gallery, London, 2016.
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Patrick Langley

Huma Bhabha’s humanoid sculpture In the Shadow of the Sun (2016), displayed on a low white plinth in a brightly lit room in London’s Stephen Friedman Gallery, stares at the viewer with inscrutable, smudged black eyes. The figure is female. She wears a hood. Her torso, cut from Styrofoam embellished... continue reading

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ARTIST

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Art Monthly
Blum&Poe
Spike
Peres Projects
Afterimage
Brooklyn Rail
Deweer
Tulips & Roses
Marion
Carolina Nitsch
Anton Kern Gallery
Vitamin creative space
Michael Kon