ANNOUNCEMENTS

Artifex Press

May 27, 2015
Robert Irwin, Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light, 1977. Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Cloth, metal, and wood. 144 × 1368 × 49 inches. © 2015 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © Philipp Scholz Rittermann. Robert Irwin, Scrim veil—Black rectangle—Natural light, 1977. Installation view, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Cloth, metal, and wood. 144 × 1368 × 49 inches. © 2015 Robert Irwin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo © Philipp Scholz Rittermann.

Artifex Press announces the Robert Irwin catalogue raisonné edited by Marianne Stockebrand

Artifex Press is pleased to announce that it will publish the Robert Irwin catalogue raisonné, and that Marianne Stockebrand has been named Editor of the project.   Stockebrand, former Director of the Chinati Foundation, Marfa, Texas, and organizer of an Irwin retrospective during her time as Director of Kölnischer Kunstverein, Cologne, Germany, will edit the catalogue raisonné of Robert Irwin's complete works, spanning six decades,... continue reading

Kayne Griffin Corcoran

May 26, 2015
Left: Liza Ryan, Wind(shield) hail, 2014. Chromogenic print, 61 1/4 x 43 1/2 inches. Courtesy the artist and Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. © Liza Ryan. Right: Max Hooper Schneider, Accidental Menagerie, 2015 (detail). Mixed media, acrylic trays, polymer resin, aluminum structure, custom hardware, 120 x 108 x 15 inches. Courtesy the artist and Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. © Max Hooper Schneider. Left: Liza Ryan, Wind(shield) hail, 2014. Chromogenic print, 61 1/4 x 43 1/2 inches. Courtesy the artist and Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. © Liza Ryan. Right: Max Hooper Schneider, Accidental Menagerie, 2015 (detail). Mixed media, acrylic trays, polymer resin, aluminum structure, custom hardware, 120 x 108 x 15 inches. Courtesy the artist and Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles. © Max Hooper Schneider.

Liza Ryan and Max Hooper Schneider at Kayne Griffin Corcoran

Kayne Griffin Corcoran is pleased to present Wind(Shield), a new body of work by Liza Ryan, and Accidental Menagerie, two new large-scale sculptural projects by Max Hooper Schneider. In the main gallery, Wind(shield) continues Ryan’s long-running exploration of the idea of separation. Looking closely at boundaries such as skin, the walls of a house, or the cars that separate us from the world, she examines the fluidity of interior and... continue reading

HALMOS

May 26, 2015
   

Halmos announces the public launch of Library Stack

Halmos is pleased to announce the public launch of Library Stack—a new website developed to create access points between commercial databases and the open domain of public libraries. Art's increasing tendency to take form as digital objects has inadvertently resulted in its mediums being regulated by proprietary and closed systems. Amazon, Apple and Barnes & Noble collectively control 95% of all digital ebooks for which buyers are given a... continue reading

REVIEWS

“The Bank Show: Vive Le Capital”
BANK, Shanghai
View of “The Bank Show: Vive le Capital,” BANK, Shanghai, 2015.

by MING LIN

An exhibition title containing a phrase like “Vive Le Capital” suggests a degree of irony in its subject matter. With a roster of some 24 artists and ambitious claims of “exploring the omnipresent power of global finance,” one expects an assortment of vaguely related works—critiques, interventions, manifestos—all of which gravitate... continue reading

Iman Issa’s “Lexicon”
RODEO, London
Iman Issa, Fortune Teller (study for 2013), 2013.

by ORIT GAT

What is the role of description in the way we talk about art? In art-historical discourse, iconography won out over formal analysis. The focus on line, color, and shape was replaced by the primacy of the subject matter. But more often than not, talking about art means talking about stuff... continue reading

Vitaly Komar’s “Allegories of Justice”
RONALD FELDMAN FINE ARTS, New York
Vitaly Komar, Victory over the Sun, 2010–2015. Tempera and oil on canvas, 36 x 108 inches.

by KIM LEVIN

Vitaly Komar, formerly half of the illustrious team Komar & Melamid, which split in 2003, continues to paint in a style he has dubbed “New Symbolism.” For more than a decade, his virtuosic paintings of the proverbial scales of justice, tiny birds of truth, hulking Russian bears waving red flags,... continue reading

DOSSIER

Spike
Michael Kon
e-flux iPad
galeria nara roesler
Luisa Strina
X-TRA
Blum&Poe
Anton Kern Gallery
White Flag
The Third Line
Art Monthly
The breeder
MIA Art Fair