ANNOUNCEMENTS

Border Crossings

December 15, 2017
Cover: Richard Serra, Equal, 2015. Detail, forged steel, eight identical blocks, each 60 x 66 x 72 inches, two blocks in each of four stacks, each stack 11 feet high. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Cristiano Mascaro. Cover: Richard Serra, Equal, 2015. Detail, forged steel, eight identical blocks, each 60 x 66 x 72 inches, two blocks in each of four stacks, each stack 11 feet high. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Photo: Cristiano Mascaro.

Border Crossings issue 144

In this issue Border Crossings looks in large part at contemporary sculpture in the work of two artists, American icon Richard Serra and Montreal-based Jean-Pierre Gauthier. Both invoke a sense of empathy and engagement through a sensual understanding of material. The hard steel and industrial material is transformed, through scale in the case of Richard Serra, and through kinetic assemblages in the case of Gauthier.... continue reading

Daniel & Florence Guerlain Contemporary Art Foundation

December 15, 2017
Left: Mamma Andersson, Swan Song II, 2016. Ink on paper, 70 x 49.5 cm. Courtesy Galleri Magnus Karlsson. © Per-Erik Adamson. Middle: Juul Kraijer, Untitled, 2012. Charcoal on paper, 95.9 x 72.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Florence and Daniel Guerlain Collection. Right: Leiko Ikemura, Face II, 2008. Watercolour on paper, 21 x 15 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Left: Mamma Andersson, Swan Song II, 2016. Ink on paper, 70 x 49.5 cm. Courtesy Galleri Magnus Karlsson. © Per-Erik Adamson. Middle: Juul Kraijer, Untitled, 2012. Charcoal on paper, 95.9 x 72.2 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Florence and Daniel Guerlain Collection. Right: Leiko Ikemura, Face II, 2008. Watercolour on paper, 21 x 15 cm. Courtesy of the artist.

Daniel & Florence Guerlain Contemporary Art Foundation presents 2018 Drawing Prize

The Daniel & Florence Guerlain Foundation has announced the names of the three selected artists for the 2018 prize on December 14 at the Beaux-Arts of Paris. An exhibition of the three artists will be shown in Paris at the Salon du Dessin from the 21 to the 26 of March 2018 in the Palais Brongniart. The winner will be announced on March 22. Members of the 2018 jury are:  Charles Asprey (United Kingdom), Patrice Boissonnas (France), Florence... continue reading

Mousse

December 14, 2017
Mousse #61, "On Display," December 2017–January 2018. Courtesy Mousse Magazine & Publishing Mousse #61, "On Display," December 2017–January 2018. Courtesy Mousse Magazine & Publishing

Mousse #61 out now

This issue of Mousse explores the ways in which concerns surrounding exhibition display and elements derived from exhibition architecture have been appropriated by contemporary artworks and art practices, and how artistic modes and attitudes have played a significant role in shaping the lexicon of exhibition design. We asked a diverse pool of guest contributors—artists, curators, writers, art and architecture critics—to select illuminating... continue reading

REVIEWS

“A Synchronology: The Contemporary and Other Times”
HUNTERIAN ART GALLERY, Glasgow
Corin Sworn, Temporal Arrangements (detail), 2010.

by TOM JEFFREYS

Flowers fade at different rates. In the November chill of a Glasgow art gallery, cut flowers—carefully arranged in a vase on the floor, their silhouette cast against the wall by the light from a projector—are taking their time to die, or to appear dead. (When exactly do cut flowers die?)... continue reading

Runo Lagomarsino’s “We Have Been Called Many Names”
NILS STAERK, Copenhagen
Runo Lagomarsino, We have been called many names, 2017.

by MARIA KJAER THEMSEN

Nils Staerk is the latest commercial gallery to spring up amidst the coffee shops and organic wine bars in Nordvest, a district of Copenhagen that the local media are more likely to associate with violent crime and unemployment. A further reminder of the uncomfortable coexistence of two worlds stands directly... continue reading

David Blandy’s “The End of the World”
SEVENTEEN GALLERY, London
David Blandy, The End of the World, 2017.

by PATRICK LANGLEY

In his three-volume book Principles of Geology (1830-1833), Charles Lyell pioneered a theory whose clunky title belies its elegance. Uniformitarianism, as Lyell’s argument is known, suggests that the earth was shaped, over hundreds of millions of years, by incremental processes that are observable all around us: erosion, sedimentation, and so... continue reading

DOSSIER

flashart
Peres Projects
Gallery Ernst Hilger
Air the paris
X-TRA
sp-arte
P420
The breeder
The Third Line
MIA Art Fair
Brooklyn Rail
Afterimage
Luisa Strina