REVIEWS

/ ILARIA BOMBELLI
View of “Neon Paradise: Shamanism from Central Asia,” Laura Bulian Gallery, Milan, 2017.
by

Ilaria Bombelli

One clean cut and—snip!—the plait of hair flops to the floor. Then comes the next braid—snip!—and the next—snip-snip! Strand by strand, all the remaining black hair of this Asian woman, dressed in traditional Kyrgyz garb, is sheared off by her own hand. It falls around her feet, leaving her neck... continue reading
Wael Shawky

LISSON GALLERY, Milan

View of Wael Shawty, Lisson Gallery, Milan, 2017.
by

Ilaria Bombelli

Craggy peaks of stone, desolate plains, parched and rasping arctic coasts—still caught perhaps in some distant geologic era—provide a home to stray beasts of all kinds: the spindly heads of snakes rise like pinnacles from the summits of crumbling towers. The sagging legs of pachyderms prop up arcades redolent of... continue reading
Allison Katz’s “AKA”

GIò MARCONI, Milan

View of Allison Katz, “AKA,” Giò Marconi, Milan, 2016.
by

Ilaria Bombelli

“Rats live on no evil star.” And “In a regal age ran I.” There is no apparent truth, no evident foundation, in these two double-sided expressions—same characters, reverse order—whose heads and tails can switch places like a juggler’s pins. Just a tumbling act of letters on the tightrope of some... continue reading
Nicolas Party’s “Two Naked Women”

KAUFMANN REPETTO, Milan

View of Nicolas Party’s “Two Naked Women,” kaufmann repetto, Milan, 2015.
by

Ilaria Bombelli

Standing knee-deep in brackish water as dark as iodine, two stocky women, closely resembling each other and completely naked, have their backs turned to us. Their arms hang slack along their sides in a very relaxed pose that wraps their bones in unmoving shadow and highlights their mature, voluptuous buttocks,... continue reading
“Fatamorgana”

GALLERIA ENRICO ASTUNI, Bologna

View of “Fatamorgana,” Galleria Enrico Astuni, Bologna, 2014.
by

Ilaria Bombelli

A barren desert, a swarm of apparitions: the Italian writer Dino Buzzati’s novel, The Tartar Steppe (1940), is one of the few in Italian literature in which the idea of a hallucination, or fata morgana, becomes a narrative mechanism with allegorical power, peopled by characters worn down by endless waiting,... continue reading

AUTHOR

view all

GALLERY

view all
Abc
Bq
Kow
Non
Vw

ARTIST

view all
Magazine Mousse
Peres Projects
Spike
Cardi Black Box
art-agenda
Kaleidoscope
Sprueth Magers
Blum&Poe
Luisa Strina
Brooklyn Rail
Anton Kern Gallery
Michael Kon
flashart