REVIEWS

/ New York
Hiwa K, Pre-Image (Blind as the Mother Tongue), 2017.
by

Ania Szremski

Hiwa K doesn’t believe that art can change anything. Following a screening of his videos at the Film Society of Lincoln Center, the Iraqi-Kurdish artist explained his frustration with the uselessness of the whole contemporary art enterprise in the face of profound global violence. To hear him say that he doesn’t... continue reading
Frieze New York

FRIEZE ART FAIR, New York

View of Frieze New York, New York, 2018.
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Orit Gat

It’s summer in May. It’s been a long winter, and a long semester teaching art history is drawing to a close. The past four months I’ve been talking to my students about the political possibilities of art: trying to convince them not to look away, but to be moved, to... continue reading
Laure Prouvost

LISSON GALLERY, New York

View of Laure Prouvost at Lisson Gallery, New York, 2018.
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Alan Gilbert

Eager to see the art in Laure Prouvost’s first solo exhibition at Lisson Gallery in New York, visitors might breeze through its central installation: Uncle’s Travel Agency Franchise, Deep Travel Ink. NYC (2016–18). Situated at the entrance to the gallery, it looks like an unkempt and outdated version of an... continue reading
The Armory Show and Independent Art Fair

VARIOUS LOCATIONS, New York

View of the Armory Show, New York.
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Ania Szremski

The art-fair think piece is as stale as the art fair itself. What could be said already has been, from puzzling over the mysterious machinations of the market, to annual denunciations from gallerists, and ethnographies of those who buy and those who sell. The form of writing that is truest... continue reading
Jean-Luc Godard, detail of Le Réel (rêverie) (The Real [reverie]), 2004–2006. Courtesy of the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York.
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Leo Goldsmith

In 2006, French filmmaker and polymath Jean-Luc Godard was commissioned to curate an exhibition at the Centre Pompidou, devising a series of 18 maquettes—nine large, nine small—as a plan for “Collage(s) de France: Archaeology of the Cinema.” The exhibition would link a series of rooms—each with its own title, like... continue reading
View of Judy Chicago’s “PowerPlay: A Prediction,” Salon 94, New York, 2018.
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Tess Edmonson

After the completion of The Dinner Party (1974–89), for a five-year period from 1982 to 1987, Judy Chicago interrupted her study of female subjecthood to focus instead on its political other, masculinity. The result is a series of paintings and bronzes titled “PowerPlay,” a selection of which is currently on... continue reading

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Sprueth Magers
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Magazine Mousse
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Friedrich Petzel
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Kaleidoscope
e-flux iPad
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GALLERIA MASSIMODELUCA
MIA Art Fair
Brooklyn Rail